Hurricane Zeta Makes Landfall: Live Updates


Hurricane Zeta is the latest storm in a busy season for the Gulf Coast.

Hurricane Zeta, a powerful Category 2 storm, made landfall Wednesday afternoon in southeastern Louisiana, bringing heavy rains and damaging winds to a state that has been repeatedly clobbered by hurricanes this season.

At landfall, near the fishing village of Cocodrie, La., the storm was moving at 24 miles an hour and carrying maximum sustained winds of 110 miles per hour. “It’s going to be quick but it’s going to be brutal,” said Collin Arnold, director of the New Orleans Office of Homeland Security and Emergency.

Zeta made landfall about 65 miles south-southwest of New Orleans at 4 p.m. Central time, making it the fifth named storm to strike the state this year, with about a month left in the hurricane season. The prior record of four was set in 2002, said Philip Klotzbach, a research scientist at Colorado State University.

The Lafourche Parish Sheriff’s Office posted on Twitter that property damage, including downed power lines and trees had already been reported by residents just minutes after the storm touched land.

A video posted by the Sheriff’s Office showed ripping winds and sheets of rain blowing across the road in the town of Cut Off. The office implored residents to stay inside until the storm passed.

As of 5 p.m. Central time, the eyewall of Zeta was about 20 minutes from New Orleans.

A hurricane warning was in effect Wednesday for a stretch of coast from Morgan City, La., to the Mississippi-Alabama border and the metropolitan New Orleans area. Storm surges along the Mississippi coast could reach as high as 11 feet.

The storm was expected to make a second landfall along the Mississippi coast on Wednesday evening, then move across the Southeastern and Eastern United States on Thursday, dumping up to six inches of rain in some locations.

The city of New Orleans sent regular warnings to residents via text message Wednesday. And officials took a variety of precautions in anticipation of a deluge.

The Lower Mississippi River closed to vessels at 2 a.m. Wednesday; the Port of New Orleans was also closed. Flood-protection crews were closing the gates that prevent storm surge from entering the city’s network of drainage canals. City buses stopped running at noon.

Since the heavier rains were expected to begin in early afternoon, many offices and stores also shut down at noon. As a result, grocery store checkout lines were lengthy Wednesday morning as people bought bread, canned goods, and meat to put on a gas grill, all of which can be eaten during a power outage. Shoppers also stocked up on bottled water — essential in case the drinking water system loses power.

Many residents who live near the Gulf of Mexico in areas unprotected by levees headed to higher ground on Wednesday; other stalwarts who live in raised houses planned to weather the storm within their…



Read MoreHurricane Zeta Makes Landfall: Live Updates

Hurricane Zeta Makes Landfall: Live Updates


Hurricane Zeta is the latest storm in a busy season for the Gulf Coast.

Hurricane Zeta, a powerful Category 2 storm, made landfall Wednesday afternoon in southeastern Louisiana, bringing heavy rains and damaging winds to a state that has been repeatedly clobbered by hurricanes this season.

At landfall, near the fishing village of Cocodrie, La., the storm was moving at 24 miles an hour and carrying maximum sustained winds of 110 miles per hour. “It’s going to be quick but it’s going to be brutal,” said Collin Arnold, director of the New Orleans Office of Homeland Security and Emergency.

Zeta made landfall about 65 miles south-southwest of New Orleans at 4 p.m. Central time, making it the fifth named storm to strike the state this year, with about a month left in the hurricane season. The prior record of four was set in 2002, said Philip Klotzbach, a research scientist at Colorado State University.

The Lafourche Parish Sheriff’s Office posted on Twitter that property damage, including downed power lines and trees had already been reported by residents just minutes after the storm touched land.

A video posted by the Sheriff’s Office showed ripping winds and sheets of rain blowing across the road in the town of Cut Off. The office implored residents to stay inside until the storm passed.

As of 5 p.m. Central time, the eyewall of Zeta was about 20 minutes from New Orleans.

A hurricane warning was in effect Wednesday for a stretch of coast from Morgan City, La., to the Mississippi-Alabama border and the metropolitan New Orleans area. Storm surges along the Mississippi coast could reach as high as 11 feet.

The storm was expected to make a second landfall along the Mississippi coast on Wednesday evening, then move across the Southeastern and Eastern United States on Thursday, dumping up to six inches of rain in some locations.

The city of New Orleans sent regular warnings to residents via text message Wednesday. And officials took a variety of precautions in anticipation of a deluge.

The Lower Mississippi River closed to vessels at 2 a.m. Wednesday; the Port of New Orleans was also closed. Flood-protection crews were closing the gates that prevent storm surge from entering the city’s network of drainage canals. City buses stopped running at noon.

Since the heavier rains were expected to begin in early afternoon, many offices and stores also shut down at noon. As a result, grocery store checkout lines were lengthy Wednesday morning as people bought bread, canned goods, and meat to put on a gas grill, all of which can be eaten during a power outage. Shoppers also stocked up on bottled water — essential in case the drinking water system loses power.

Many residents who live near the Gulf of Mexico in areas unprotected by levees headed to higher ground on Wednesday; other stalwarts who live in raised houses planned to weather the storm within their…



Read MoreHurricane Zeta Makes Landfall: Live Updates