You’re Buying Your Weed Wrong


Imagine ordering a beer at a bar that’s labeled as having 6 percent ABV, and getting served a drink that’s anywhere from 2 to 12 percent.

When you’re buying your cannabis, there can be that much variability in THC. 

Cannabis consumers have been taught to buy their weed wrong. High taxes push many dispensary customers to search for the best bang for their buck, and due to the prominence of THC on cannabis labeling, consumers often use it as the sole indicator of cannabis quality. High THC and a low price point is considered the holy grail. 

In reality, THC is far from the only indicator of good cannabis. It doesn’t determine the type of experience one has when they ingest a cannabis product, and due to industry pressure and a lack of standardization, THC percentages are far from an exact science. 

“I don’t look at the THC percentage when I’m choosing the cannabis that I like to smoke,” says Allen Hackett, co-founder of the vertically integrated family of brands MD Numbers. “It’s much more about strains that have characteristics and a terpene profile that I personally like.” 

In order to be able to buy a product and achieve a desired result, customers need to know a lot more than how to read a THC label. Until consumers have that education, THC percentages will continue to drive market trends in a way that disadvantages both consumers and operators. 

Full Spectrum

If you’ve shopped around at a California dispensary lately, you’ve probably seen the term “full spectrum,” printed on edible, topical, or tincture products. “Full spectrum” refers to a product that contains the full profile of chemical compounds that grow within the cannabis plant. Any time you smoke a jazz cigarette, you’re getting a full-spectrum experience. However many other products are made with isolated THC, CBD, or other compounds. 

Sometimes, especially in specific medical contexts, it can be preferable to hand-select only a couple of cannabinoids to consume. But in the vast majority of cases, users get closer to the experience they want with a full-spectrum product. It’s the other components of this full spectrum that can make a 10mg indica gummy feel differently than a 10mg sativa gummy, for example. All of these chemical compounds act synergistically within the body to give various strains their unique effects. 

Cannabinoids

Cannabinoids are the components of the spectrum most consumers are familiar with. THC is a cannabinoid. CBD is also a well-understood and heavily marketed cannabinoid, known for decreasing anxiety and dulling pain. It may even combat seizures and symptoms of schizophrenia. CBN, the chemical THC turns into when it degrades overtime, has a subtle sedative effect and may regulate sleep cycles. THCV is being studied as both a possible aid for type 2 diabetes and epilepsy-related…



Read MoreYou’re Buying Your Weed Wrong

You’re Buying Your Weed Wrong


Imagine ordering a beer at a bar that’s labeled as having 6 percent ABV, and getting served a drink that’s anywhere from 2 to 12 percent.

When you’re buying your cannabis, there can be that much variability in THC. 

Cannabis consumers have been taught to buy their weed wrong. High taxes push many dispensary customers to search for the best bang for their buck, and due to the prominence of THC on cannabis labeling, consumers often use it as the sole indicator of cannabis quality. High THC and a low price point is considered the holy grail. 

In reality, THC is far from the only indicator of good cannabis. It doesn’t determine the type of experience one has when they ingest a cannabis product, and due to industry pressure and a lack of standardization, THC percentages are far from an exact science. 

“I don’t look at the THC percentage when I’m choosing the cannabis that I like to smoke,” says Allen Hackett, co-founder of the vertically integrated family of brands MD Numbers. “It’s much more about strains that have characteristics and a terpene profile that I personally like.” 

In order to be able to buy a product and achieve a desired result, customers need to know a lot more than how to read a THC label. Until consumers have that education, THC percentages will continue to drive market trends in a way that disadvantages both consumers and operators. 

Full Spectrum

If you’ve shopped around at a California dispensary lately, you’ve probably seen the term “full spectrum,” printed on edible, topical, or tincture products. “Full spectrum” refers to a product that contains the full profile of chemical compounds that grow within the cannabis plant. Any time you smoke a jazz cigarette, you’re getting a full-spectrum experience. However many other products are made with isolated THC, CBD, or other compounds. 

Sometimes, especially in specific medical contexts, it can be preferable to hand-select only a couple of cannabinoids to consume. But in the vast majority of cases, users get closer to the experience they want with a full-spectrum product. It’s the other components of this full spectrum that can make a 10mg indica gummy feel differently than a 10mg sativa gummy, for example. All of these chemical compounds act synergistically within the body to give various strains their unique effects. 

Cannabinoids

Cannabinoids are the components of the spectrum most consumers are familiar with. THC is a cannabinoid. CBD is also a well-understood and heavily marketed cannabinoid, known for decreasing anxiety and dulling pain. It may even combat seizures and symptoms of schizophrenia. CBN, the chemical THC turns into when it degrades overtime, has a subtle sedative effect and may regulate sleep cycles. THCV is being studied as both a possible aid for type 2 diabetes and epilepsy-related…



Read MoreYou’re Buying Your Weed Wrong